Women Embarrassed By Their Feet

Nice out of 10 women have experienced problems with their feet, while one in five are embarrassed by them, according to new research. According to a 2008 study, more than 50 percent of women say their feet embarrass them “always, frequently or sometimes,” according to a 2008 study of 500 women by Kelton Research for the American Podiatric Medical Association. Facebook has dozens of “I Hate Feet” groups; one of the largest has morewomen embarrassed by their feet than 106K members to date.

As a result, it’s estimated that this summer more than one in 10 women (12%) have resorted to covering up their feet in front of people because they are ashamed by their appearance, says The College of Podiatry – the professional body for registered chiropodists and podiatrists.

The findings below are based on an online survey of 2,000 men and women carried out by One Poll last month. It found the top 10 foot problems experienced by women are:

  1. Blisters (55%)
  2. Cracked heels (45%)
  3. Veruccas/warts (28%)
  4. Corns (24%)
  5. Ingrown toe nails (20%)
  6. Athletes foot (20%)
  7. Bunions (13%)
  8. Joint problems (11%)
  9. Excessive foot odour (9%)
  10. Arthritis (8.8%)

Despite these problems, according to The College of Podiatry, 19% of women have not sought help because they did not think their foot complaint was important or severe enough to warrant a visit to a podiatrist.

There are a number of simple self-help techniques for reducing unsightly foot problems and keeping your feet healthy, according to the Institute of Chiropodists and Podiatrists. It recommends:

  • Practicing good hygiene by keeping your feet clean
  • Applying lanolin or olive oil to dry skin
  • Avoiding using hot water and strong soaps
  • Drying skin carefully and not rubbing hard with a towel
  • Using a mild fungicidal powder to reduce the chances of athlete’s foot infection
  • Not cutting corns, callouses or ingrown toe nails
  • Avoiding bruises, burns, cuts, cracks and frostbite – and seeking professional help if any of these injuries occur
  • Avoiding the use of harsh or strong medications such as antiseptics containing iodine or carbolic acid, including corn cures, or chemical compounds and ointments for athlete’s foot
  • Avoiding exposure to cold and dampness
  • Seeking immediate professional care for any ulcer or sore on the foot or leg.

For foot issues like bunions & ingrown toenails,  however, Dr. Weinert recommends making an appointment to see a qualified podiatrist.  In the case of bunions, reducing the height of heels worn often helps to limit the progression of the condition; however, it should be made clear that bunions are hereditary, and that women who have them will need to stay in close contact with their podiatrist to maintain their foot health. The majority of the Dr. Weinert’s bunion patients prefer to have their bunions surgically corrected.  The bunion procedure, depending upon the severity, can be as easy as the patient being able to walk right after the surgery. More extensive cases lengthen the recovery time.

The newer advanced surgical technology used by Dr. Weinert allows more of a minimal incision procedure to be performed to adequately correct more of the mild to moderate bunion deformities.  Surgery recovery is alot quicker, patients are able to walk sooner than before and as long as patients are compliant, usually have an unremarkable recovery.

Dr Weinert has experienced a high success rate of treatment with his bunion patients and his treatment continues beyond the simple surgical procedure.  After patient is properly healed, Dr Weinert will usually get a patient into a custom orthotic device to correct their foot pathology or malalignment to ensure that the condition does no re-occur.

For more information on foot health and keeping your feet healthy and happy, visit the ACFAS patient Web site FootHealthFacts.org. You can also get some more information on Dr. Weinerts office website at www.stopfeetpainfast.com and request a copy of his book Stop Feet Pain Fast.